The Aaron Beck Center Continues to have a Productive Year!!

Below find a list of peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed publications for 2016 into 2017 from our Center.

 Peer-Reviewed

  • Adler, A., Bush, A., Weissinger, G., Barg, F. K., Beck, A. T., & Brown, G. K. (2016). A mixed methods approach to identify cognitive warning signs of suicide attempts. Archives of Suicide Research, 20, 528-538, doi: 10.1080/13811118.2015.1136717.
  • Beck, A. T., & Bredemeier, K. (2016). A unified model of depression: Integrating clinical, cognitive, biological, and evolutionary perspectives. Clinical Psychological Science, 4(4), 596-619.
  • Bredemeier, K., Warren, S.L., Berenbaum, H., Miller, G.A., & Heller, W. (2016). Executive functioning deficits associated with current and past depressive symptoms. Journal of Affective Disorders, 204, 226-233. doi:10.1016/j.jad.2016.03.070
  • Boudreaux, E. D., Brown, G. K., Stanley, B., Sadasivam, R. S., Camargo, C. A., & Miller, I. W. (in press). Computer administered safety planning for individuals at risk for suicide: Development and usability testing. Journal of Medical Internet Research. doi:10.2196/jmir.6816.
  • Brown, G.K., Karlin, B.E., Trockel, M., Gordienko, M., & Taylor, B.C. (2016). Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for Veterans with depression and suicidal ideation. Archives of Suicide Research, 20, 677-682. doi: 10.1080/13811118.2016.1162238.
  • Brown, G.K., Thase, M.E., Vittengl, J.R., Borman, P.D., Clark, L.A., & Jarrett, R.B. (2016). Assessing skills comprehension, acquisition, and use with the Independent Observer Version of the Skills of Cognitive Therapy (SoCT) scale. Psychological Assessment, 28, 205-213. doi: 10.1037/pas0000080.
  • Buitron, V., Hill, R. M., Pettit, J. W., Green, K. L., Hatkevich, C., and Sharp, C. (2016). Interpersonal stress and suicidal ideation in adolescence: An indirect association through perceived burdensomeness toward others. Journal of Affective Disorders, 190, 143-149.
  • Chesin, M., Stanley, B., Haigh, E. A., Chaudhury, S.R., Pontoski, K., Knox, K. L., & Brown, G. K. (2017). Staff views of an emergency department intervention using safety planning and structured follow-up with suicidal veterans. Archives of Suicide Research, 21, 127-137. doi: 10.1080/13811118.2016.1164642.
  • Creed, T.A., Frankel, S.A., German, R., Green, K.L., Jager-Hyman, S., Pontoski, K., Adler, A., Wolk, C.B., Stirman, S.W., Waltman, S.H., Williston, M.A., Sherrill, R., Evans, A.C., & Beck. A.T. (2016). Implementation of transdiagnostic cognitive therapy in diverse community settings: The Beck Community Initiative. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 84, 1116-1126. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000105.
  • Creed, T.A., Benjamin, C., Feinberg, B., Evans, A.C., & Beck, A.T. (2016). Beyond the Label: Relationship between community therapists’ self-report of a cognitive-behavioral therapy orientation and observed skills. Administration and Policy in Mental Health Services Research, 43, 36-43. doi 10.1007/s10488-014-0618-5.
  • Creed TA, Wolk CB, Feinberg B, Evans AC, Beck AT. (2016) Beyond the label: Relationship between community therapists’ self-repof of a cognitive behavioral therapy orientation and observed skills, Administration and Policy in Mental Health, 43, 36-43. doi: 10.1007/s10488-014-0618-5.
  • Ellis, T. E., Rufino, K. A., & Green, K. L. (2016). Implicit measure of life/death orientation predicts response of suicidal ideation to treatment in psychiatric inpatients. Archives of Suicide Research, 20, 59-68.
  • Grant, P. M., Bredemeier, K., & Beck, A. T. (In press). 6-month follow-up of recovery-oriented cognitive therapy for low functioning schizophrenia: Sustained gains and delayed response for more chronic cases. Psychiatric Services.
  • Green, K., Brown, G. K., & Jager-Hyman, S. (2016). Reply to Large and Ryan: Clinicians should not adopt a single self-reported item as a screener for suicide. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 77, 1087-1088.
  • Jenness, J., Jager-Hyman, S., Heleniak, C., Beck, A. T., Sheridan, M. A., & McLaughlin, K. A. (2016). Catastrophizing, rumination, and reappraisal prospectively predict adolescent PTSD symptom onset following a terrorist attack. Depression and Anxiety. doi: 10.1002/da.22548.
  • Kleiman, E. M., Chiara, A. M., Liu, R. T., Jager-Hyman, S., Choi, J. Y., & Alloy, L. B. (2017). Optimism and well-being: A prospective multi-method and multi-dimensional examination of optimism as a resilience factor following the occurrence of stressful life events. Cognition and Emotion, 31, 269-283.
  • Landa Y., Mueser K. T., Wyka K.E., Shreck E., Jespersen R., Jacobs M. A., Griffin K. W., van der Gaag M., Reyna V. F., Beck A. T., Silbersweig D.A., & Walkup J.T. (2016). Development of a group and family-based cognitive behavioural therapy program for youth at risk for psychosis. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 10, 511-521. doi: 10.1111/eip.12204.
  • Lewis-Hatheway, F., & Eubanks, C. (2016). The impact of a mindfulness intervention on burnout levels in direct care staff. Psychotherapy Bulletin, 51, 27-34.
  • Perlis, M. L., Grandner, M. A., Brown, G. K., Basner, M., Chakravorty, S., Morales, K. H., Gehrman, P. R., Chaudhary, N. S., Thase, M. E., Dinges, D. F. (2016). Nocturnal wakefulness as a previously unrecognized risk factor for suicide. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 77, 726-733. doi: 10.4088/JCP.15m10131
  • Perlis, M. S., Grandner, M. A., Chakravorty, S., Bernert, R. A., Brown, G. K., & Thase, M. E. (2016). Suicide and sleep: Is it a bad thing to be awake when reason sleeps? Sleep Medicine Reviews, 29, 101-107. doi: 10.1016/j.smrv.2015.10.003
  • Pontoski, K., Jager-Hyman, S., Cunningham, A., Sposato, R., Schultz, L., Evans, A. C., Beck, A. T., & Creed, T. A. (2016). Using a Cognitive Behavioral framework to train staff serving individuals who experience chronic homelessness. Journal of Community Psychology, 44, 674-680.
  • Riggs, S. & Creed, T.A. (2016) A model to transform treatment for psychosis using CBT informed interventions for the mental health milieu. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2016.08.001.
  • Rosenbaum, D.L., Schumacher, L.M., Schaumberg, K., Piers, A.D., Gaspar, M., Lowe, M.R., Forman, E.M., & Butryn, M.L. (2016). Energy intake highs and lows: How much does consistency matter in weight control? Clinical Obesity, 6, 193-201. doi: 10.1111/cob.12142.
  • Rosenbaum, D.L. & White, K.S. (2016). Does cognitive avoidance mediate the relation of anxiety and binge eating? Eating and Weight Disorders. doi:10.1007/s40519-016-0284-6.
  • Rosenbaum, D.L., Kimerling, R., Pomernacki, A., Goldstein, K.M., Yano, E.M., Sadler, A.G., Carney, D., Bastian, L.A., Bean-Mayberry, B.A., & Frayne, S.M. (2016). Binge eating among women veterans in primary care: Comorbidities and treatment priorities. Women’s Health Issues. doi: 10.1016/j.whi.2016.02.004.
  • Rosenbaum, D.L. & White, K.S. (2016). Understanding the complexity of biopsychosocial factors in the public health epidemic of overweight and obesity. Health Psychology Open, 3, 1-4. doi: 10.1177/2055102916634364.
  • Rosenbaum, D. L., Piers, A. P., Schumacher, L. M., & Butryn, M. L. (in press). Racial and ethnic minority enrollment in randomized clinical trials of behavioral weight loss utilizing technology: A systematic review. Obesity Reviews.
  • Schaumberg, K., Schumacher, L. M., Rosenbaum, D. L., Kase, C. A., Piers, A. D., Lowe, M. R., Forman, E. M., & Butryn, M. L. (2016). The role of negative reinforcement eating expectancies in the relation between experiential avoidance and disinhibition. Eating Behaviors, 21, 129–134. doi:10.1016/j.eatbeh.2016.01.003.
  • Smith, T. L., Landes, S. J., Lester-Williams, K., Day, K. T., Batdorf, W., Brown, G. K., Trockel, M., Smith, B. N., Chard, K. M., Healy, E. T., & Weingardt, K. R. (in press). Developing alternative training delivery methods to improve psychotherapy implementation in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Training and Education in Professional Psychology.
  • Stanley B., Chaudhury, S. R., Chesin, M., Pontoski, K., Bush, A. M., Knox, K. L., & Brown, G. K. (2016). An emergency department intervention and follow-up to reduce suicide risk in the VA: Acceptability and effectiveness. Psychiatric Services, 67, 680-683. doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.201500082.
  • Stirman, S. W, Pontoski, K., Creed, T., Xhezo, R., Evans, A. C., Beck, A.T., & Crits-Christoph, P. (2017). A non-randomized comparison of strategies for consultation in a community-academic training program to implement an evidence-based psychotherapy. Administration Policy in Mental Health, 44, 55-66. doi: 10.1007/s10488-015-0700-7.
  • Talkovsky, A. M., Green, K. L., Osegueda, A., & Norton, P. J. (2017). Secondary depression in transdiagnostic group cognitive behavioral therapy among individuals diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 46, 56-64.
  • Thomas, E. C., Luther, L., Zullo, L., Beck, A. T., & Grant P. M, (2017). From neurocognition to community participation in serious mental illness: the intermediary role of dysfunctional attitudes and motivation. Psychological Medicine, 47, 822-836. doi: 10.1017/S0033291716003019.
  • Waltman, S. H., Creed, T. A., & Beck. A. T. (2016). Are the effects of cognitive therapy for depression falling? Review and critique of the evidence. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 23, 113-122.
  • Waltman, S.H., Hall, B., McFarr, L., Beck, A.T., & Creed, T.A. (2016). In-session stuck points and pitfalls of community clinicians learning CBT: A qualitative investigation. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice. doi:10.1016/j.cbpra.2016.04.002.

 

Non-Peer Reviewed

  • Brown, G. K., & Karlin, B. E. (2017). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for depression: A manual for Kaiser Permanente therapists. Waltham, MA: Education Development Center, Inc.
  • Brown, G. K., & Karlin, B. E. (2017). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for depression: A manual for Kaiser Permanente training consultants. Waltham, MA: Education Development Center, Inc.
  • Chang, N. A., Jager-Hyman, S., Brown, G. K., Cunningham, A., & Stanley, B. (in press). Treating the suicidal patient: Cognitive Behaviroal Therapy and Dialectival Behavior Therapy. In O’Connor, R. C., Platt, S. & Gordon, J. (Eds.), International handbook of suicide prevention: Research, policy and practice (Second Edition). West Sussex, UK: Wiley & Sons.
  • Creed, T. (2016). Increasing access to high-fidelity Cognitive Therapy for underserved populations. American Psychological Association Division 12: Society of Clinical Psychology Clinical Bulletin. Retrieved from gra/
  • Creed, T.A. (February, 2017). Children’s Emotional Buckets: The Power of Positive Interactions. Cognitive Therapy Today.
  • Creed, T.A. & Waltman, S. H. Therapeutic alliance. (in press). In A. Wenzel (Ed.), The SAGE Encyclopedia of Abnormal and Clinical Psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.
  • Jager-Hyman, S., & Brown, G. K. (in press). Psychosocial treatment for suicide prevention. In A. Wenzel (Ed.), SAGE Encyclopedia of Abnormal and Clinical Psychology. New York: SAGE.
  • Waltman, S. H., Frankel, S. A., & Williston, M. A. (2016). Improving clinician self-awareness and increasing accurate representation of clinical competencies. Practice Innovations.
  • Wright, J. H., Thase, M. E., Bosco, M. R. & Brown, G. K. (2017). Learning Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: An Illustrated Guide, Second Edition. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association Publishing.

Now in Press! Beck Recovery Network Article on Dysfunctional Attitudes and Motivation Predicting Community Involvement and Recovery in Individuals with Serious Mental Illness

From neurocognition to community participation in serious mental illness: the intermediary role of dysfunctional attitudes and motivation.

 E. C. Thomas, L. Luther, L. Zullo, A. T. Beck, P. M. Grant

Evidence for a relationship between neurocognition and functional outcome in important areas of community living is robust in serious mental illness research. Dysfunctional attitudes (defeatist performance beliefs and asocial beliefs) have been identified as intervening variables in this causal chain. This study seeks to expand upon previous research by longitudinally testing the link between neurocognition and community participation (i.e. time in community-based activity) through dysfunctional attitudes and motivation.

Adult outpatients with serious mental illness (N = 175) participated, completing follow-up assessments approximately 6 months after initial assessment. Path analysis tested relationships between baseline neurocognition, emotion perception, functional skills, dysfunctional attitudes, motivation, and outcome (i.e. community participation) at baseline and follow-up.

Path models demonstrated two pathways to community participation. The first linked neurocognition and community participation through functional skills, defeatist performance beliefs, and motivation. A second pathway linked asocial beliefs and community participation, via a direct path passing through motivation. Model fit was excellent for models predicting overall community participation at baseline and, importantly, at follow-up.

The existence of multiple pathways to community participation in a longitudinal model supports the utility of multi-modal interventions for serious mental illness (i.e. treatment packages that build upon individuals’ strengths while addressing the array of obstacles to recovery) that feature dysfunctional attitudes and motivation as treatment targets.

 In Press, Psychological Medicine; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291716003019

Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy was Described in NAMI’s March 2016 Blog Segment

 

NAMI’s March 2016 Blog posted an article authored by Drs. Beck and Grant about the efficacy of treating psychosis with Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy (CT-R). In it, Drs. Beck and Grant expound upon their understanding of how defeatist and asocial beliefs, which result in a lack of motivation, directly feed the prominence of a person’s negative symptoms. Historically, there was little hope for recovery or improvement of an individual’s quality of life when treating these cases. Drs. Beck and Grant are changing that. 

Through their use of their newly-developed CT-R, Drs. Beck and Grant outline their methodology of thinking: if maladaptive defeatist and asocial beliefs can be addressed, perhaps a marked improvement in negative symptoms could be observed. After multiple interventions with countless patients, Drs. Beck and Grant feel confident that this approach could have lasting and far-reaching positive results. 

They describe a case of an individual with severe negative symptoms following a CT-R invention:

“An individual who spent most of his time sitting in a chair staring at the wall: after decades of little progress, he was able to succeed in the community, and in fact, had a girlfriend and was able to get a job … This program is a new approach that can provide hope of recovery from this very disabling disorder for even the most withdrawn individuals.”

To access full article: Transformation: Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy for Schizophrenia

Recent Psychiatric News article describes success of Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy for low functioning schizophrenia

According to the article:

“Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a rigorous and proven approach to help with a wide range of mental disorders, but is it an approach that can work for everybody? Given the intensity of the sessions and the commitment involved in maintaining regular visits, it has been presumed that low-functioning patients would likely not benefit from CBT.”

“Paul Grant, Ph.D., an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine, didn’t think that this had to be case and that even patients with severe schizophrenia who were hindered by their psychoses and cognitive defects could be improved. He says, ‘I think clinicians sometimes forget there are people underneath all those symptoms,’ he continued. ‘They’ve had very unfortunate experiences and have become socially withdrawn, but they can come out of their shells.’ ”

To access the full article in psychiatric news: CBT Found to Be Successful in Low-Functioning Patients

New Publication from ATB-PRC Researchers Finds Catastrophic Thoughts About the Future are Linked to Suicide Attempts

According to the press release:

“Suicide has been on the increase recently in the United States, currently accounting for almost 40,000 deaths a year.  A new study shows that one successful effort to avoid suicide attempts would be to focus on correcting the distorted, catastrophic thoughts about the future that are held by many who try to kill themselves.  Such thoughts are unique and characteristic to those who attempt suicide, says Shari Jager-Hyman of the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in the US. Jager-Hyman led a study, published in Springer’s journal Cognitive Therapy and Research, about how distorted thoughts influence suicidal behaviors in patients who seek emergency psychiatric treatment.”

“To prevent suicides, therapists would benefit from directly targeting patients’ thoughts of hopelessness in clinical interventions,” says Jager-Hyman. “A cognitive approach can help patients evaluate their beliefs that negative outcomes will inevitably occur, and show them how to entertain other possible options. This can help to minimize patients’ thoughts of hopelessness, help them to cope better, and ideally decrease their suicidal ideation and behaviors.”


The full press release: Catastrophic thoughts about the future linked to suicidal patients

The full article in Cognitive Therapy and Research: Cognitive Distortions and Suicide Attempts

 

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